The Curriculum

Educational Mission

Sinai Hospital's internal medicine residency program provides residents with a three-year curriculum, emphasizing the skills required to practice general internal medicine and the proficiency needed for board certification.

Our curriculum covers all subspecialty areas of medicine as well as topics related to medicine, nutrition, ethics and research, among other areas. Our goal is to foster lifelong learning in a supportive and friendly environment. Our residents enjoy a close relationship with faculty members and have easy access to numerous basic and clinical research projects on site. Graduates going on to fellowships view this as a valuable springboard to a successful subspecialty career, while graduates planning to practice general internal medicine find that this pragmatic experience equips them well for clinical practice. All of our didactics embody the principles of evidence-based medicine and high-value care.

Curriculum Objectives

Ambulatory Medicine

This training experience is designed to teach residents the essential aspects of ambulatory medical practice and the principles of managed care. Residents see their own patients throughout the three-year program and work closely with ambulatory preceptors who ensure they acquire the necessary knowledge and skills to practice outpatient internal medicine. Many electives are available that reinforce or expand the scope of training in ambulatory practice. Training at a community-based practice site is an essential building block of the resident’s training experience, and opportunities within the Sinai program are plentiful. Ambulatory experiences are provided in a variety of specialty areas, including: dermatology, urology, otolaryngology (ENT), orthopedics, ophthalmology, rehabilitation and gynecology. A self-directed, computer-based ambulatory curriculum is used to augment the learning process.


Inpatient Medicine

The curriculum in inpatient internal medicine gives residents an opportunity for autonomy in diagnostic decision-making and care of acutely ill patients. The diversity of the patient population served by Sinai Hospital encourages residents to learn the delicate interplay between social circumstances and the management of complex illness. Residents will have the opportunity to provide ongoing care for these patients following discharge in their office practice. PGY-2 and PGY-3 residents will further their medical education by supervising the work of PGY-1 residents on the patient care units and teaching medical students from The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.


Critical Care Medicine

Residents learn to manage patients with cardiovascular disease and other complex, critical illnesses while in the intensive care and coronary care units. They are given significant autonomy in patient care decisions and medical procedures. Cardiology and critical care faculty provide teaching and case-based supervision in settings where a core understanding of pathophysiology is emphasized.

Representative Resident Rotation Schedule

Residents are assigned 13 four-week rotation blocks, with each rotation lasting either two weeks (0.5 block) or four weeks (1 block).
A representative schedule for the three-year curriculum is shown below:

 

PGY-1 (Preliminary)

Rotations

Inpatient General Medicine

4

Critical Care

2

Elective

3 – 4.5

Emergency Medicine (Anesthesiology only)

1

Night Float

1.5 – 2

Vacation

1

 

PGY-1 (Categorical)

Rotations

Inpatient General Medicine

4 – 4.5

Critical Care

2

Elective

1.5 – 2

Inpatient Selective

1

Emergency Medicine

1

Ambulatory Medicine

0.5

Night Float

1.5

Vacation

1

 

PGY-2 (Categorical)

Rotations

Inpatient General Medicine

3.5 – 4.5

Critical Care

2

Elective

2.5

Night Float

1

Cardiology Selective / CCU

1

Solid Tumor Oncology at Johns Hopkins Hospital

1

Geriatric Medicine at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center

1

Vacation

1

 

PGY-3 (Categorical)

Rotations

Inpatient General Medicine

3 – 4

Critical Care

1 – 2

Elective

3

Night Float

1-1.5

Ambulatory Medicine

1

Medical Consultation

1

Neurology

1

Renal Transplant Medicine at Johns Hopkins Hospital

1

Vacation

1

 

Please Note 

Residents are typically admitting until 7 p.m. every four days while on inpatient rotations and every three days while in the ICU. Electives must be approved by the program director and meet ambulatory requirements and individual needs. Only one four-week away elective is allowed per academic year. You must reach 4.5 rotations or electives over the three-year period in ambulatory areas. No more than one elective per year is allowed in emergency medicine. Critical care experience represents six months of the three-year categorical residency as allowed by RRC.

The program director reserves the right to alter this schedule.